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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
this administration. we have to reduce spending. we are heading down the same path that greece did. right now the democrats are talking about raising taxes on the top 2%. if we do not stop the spending, we will be back here again maybe one year from now saying, maybe we need to raise taxes on the top 25% or 50%. then everybody will be taxed and we will run out of money. what is going to happen is the federal government is not going to be able to take care of its obligations. you are not going to be able to have safety nets. social security and medicare are going broke. we have to fix those of those who are dependent on those systems can get them. continuing to spend money like both parties have been doing the, wild spending is going to lead us to be just like greece. we are not going to be able to take care of the poor or the needy or take care of senior citizens. we have to stop spending. host: this is fiscal year 2010, but it has not changed significantly in terms of percentage. 41% of the federal budget. not defense appropriations 19%. defense spending 20%. the national debt 6%. we're in t
in new york city. trek through the himalayas for $400. explore the secret gardens of greece. these are all with locals. what these companies are doing, they're enabling people who have jobs that they love and they have different hobbies to actually make money by showing this to other people. i spoke with all the entrepreneurs that started these companies and they kept saying happiness is about the memories, something can you give on the holidays. >> anything involving food is okay with me. thank you very much, lori. >>> you've probably been hearing christmas music for a few weeks now. but you probably haven't heard this. the beautiful sounds of celtic woman. these singers have something special. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. [ tylenol bottle ] me
happened, it happens all the time. people always compare the u.s. being next greece. you know what? confiscation of private pensions happened in greece. it happened in the last year. it happened in argentina. in ireland to pay forbillion stimulus spending. a wealth tax of some sort especially on 401(k)s which you point out people put aside to save for their own future i don't think that is out of bounds on this president at all. he is firmly committed to spending and collectivism. eventually bills have to be paid. they will use people's private assets. gerri: not just the president. every elected official in washington seems to be the exact same way. they want to get our hands on our money we have to be alert. it is not irresponsible to mention it. i don't think so. jonathan, really appreciate your time. >> thanks, gerri, we'll be right back with my two cents more and the answer to the question of the day, who do you trust more, the epa or aaa? [ male announcer ] at scottrade, we believe the more you know, e better you trade. so have ongoing webinars a intactive learning, plus, in
sebastian bach. >> oh john sebastian! you're playing your music like crazy and i'm listening to it in greece! what are you doing here? oh john! why aren't you home minding the children? i at least had some business in greece! i had a father that killed every phaedra! phaedra! phaedra! >> that scene actually keeps coming to mind as i try to follow the melodrama in washington that has us heading for a cliff. a fiscal cliff. but are we? or is this, another myth in the making? for some insight, we turn to two seasoned observers both of whose books you'll want to as santa to leave in your stocking. bruce bartlett was an economic adviser to the supply-side icon jack kemp, and to two presidents -- ronald reagan and the first george bush. he got into hot water with his conservative cohorts when he wrote a widely quoted book critical of the second president bush. his most recent work is "the benefit and the burden: tax reform-why we need it and what it will take." yves smith is the founder and editor of the popular blog naked capitalism. after 25 years in the financial services industry, she now head
greece or getting out of debt. this deal won't affect the debt situation. it will be a political victory for the president and i hope we will have the courage of our convictions when it comes time to raise the debt ceiling to fight for what we believe in asp republicans. but hats off to the president, he won. >> chris: you don't think some of the more conservative colleagues will filibuster or set up a procedural road block? they will vote to avoid going over the cliff? >> no, but if mcconnell can't get 60% of us to vote for this deal it will be hard for boehner to get it through the house. i will want to vote for it even though i won't like it because the country has a lot at stake here. >> chris: is senator graham right? will we get a deal? >> i think he is partially right. yesterday 2.1 million americans lost extended unemployment insurance and from this point on it is lose, lose. my big worry is a contraction of the economy, the loss of jobs which could be well over two million in addition to the people already on unemployment. i think contraction of the economy really would be just
'll lose everything we know as america if we don't fix entitlements. we're becoming the greece of out-of-control spending. [ ♪ dramatic ♪ ] >> it in no way does that. >> stephanie: shut down that argument. the spending graphs of who -- >> nonsense. >> also, greece is falling apart because of the austerity programs implemented by the inf and the world bank. >> stephanie: we have references on that. they're wrong wrong wrong on everything. [ wah wah ] >> stephanie: i'm flabbergasted how wrong they are. 17 minutes arrive the hour. you know what else flabbergasts me? being able to carbonate soda in 90 seconds. >> my friend had a soda stream. i got to do it. it is amazing. >> did you karate chop? >> no but it is amazing seriously. >> stephanie: you're such a sad little man. >> i don't get out much! >> stephanie: new way to enjoy great-tasting soda made fresh at home. >> i'm flabbergasted. >> stephanie: flabbergasting how good it is with bourbon. you can make it fresh at home. everybody loves a soda s
continues on. tom, likely they will get less. the pensions in greece were guaranteed by the government, ma were cut as much as 35%. so, when you have government intervene shin in whainterventia private market enterprise, the public get hurt. like all of these safety net programs, the entitlement programs, once the seed is planted, they are almost impossible to get rid of, and left with a multibillion dollar deficit like in this case. tom: fha, we got into the mortgage mess because people had no skin in the game to a greatic tent, no money down, little money down, 1% be 3%, that is what the fha is still doing, making loans with almost no money down. why do you not expect a problem? >> we have got a problem. in my opinion, we got into housing crisis because of government, and as the administration takes laps about their successful bailout of general motors, that we lost billions of dollars o as taxpayers, we still have fharc, ha and fannie and freddie. tom: it is both of them are amazing. when it comes to fha, how -- this could take years to work this without, like you said, fannie and fredd
for government to keep raising the value added tax. we've seen it happened in spain, italy and greece and wherever it's tried. adam: i lived in spain a long time ago. i guess you realize you don't paying it at the time but things are more expensive. david: thank you, gang. thank you very much. thanks to the company. thanks to you for watching. now here are dagen and dennis. hi, gang. dagen: merry christmas. love to your family. david: thank you. same to yours. dagen: i'm dagen mcdowell everybody. dennis: i'm dennis neal -- kneale. dagen: is it the fiscal cliff fears that have shoppers down this season? retailers are reporting slowing sales over the last couple of weeks. dennis: a woman fired for being too attractive and a supreme court says it is legal. dagen: i will bite my tongue because it is the top of the hour and stocks now and every 15 minutes. nicole petallides at the new york stock exchange. hey nicole. nicole: i look forward to hearing more about that particular story as i watch the stock market here, i do see the dow is down about 1/3 of 1%. majority of the dow components a
the drain there is going to be physical, you think greece is bad wait until you see what happens here. that could very well happen in this country. am i wrong? >> not at all. it's not going to happen overnight. clearly at some point and we know when that point is 90%, 100% of ratio debt to g.d.p. we are already under obama divent to g.d.p. the ratio of debt to g.d.p. was 44%. it's now about 73%. that's in four years. that's astronomical. >> he sees the same stats that you see, that i see. he knows it. he knows what he is doing. yet, when you present this to the democratic party or even to the american people who by the way voted for this the american people voted for. this barack obama made no campaign promises that he would cut spending, none. he didn't say he would reign in government, none. yet the american people said you know what? that's okay with us. you keep spending, you keep getting it up there and we will take our chances. do you think most americans understand this? >> not at all. and i think it's pretty easy to win elections when you give away candy that you borrow from t
it with greece and the fiscal compact and the uk v vetoing the agreements. you can put it back together again. but there's an enormous amount of damage, a lack of credibility and a feeling of lack of investor confidence that's taken place during that process. and to your very point, let's look at this for a second. we have the fiscal cliff. you then have the debt ceiling. don't forget the debt ceiling. then you go back to the middle of 2013. by the time you get to it, you're back to a budget impass once again. so you're right, it's perpetual cliffs and falls and slowdowns. >> that just is not very heartening, my friend. so why is the u.s. stock market having one of the best years, one of the ten best years ever? >> that's an easy one. firstly, very low. 2008, look at the graph. and it's gone like that all the way down and it's come back up again and equities remain cheap. bonds weren't doing that much. it was a perfect opportunity to take advantage of certain special situations. but don't be fooled. there's an element of scotch missed about this. the first whiff of really nasty problems, you'
the dollar, rallying to a near seven week high against the green back after greece announced its debt buy back terms. euro rose to a $1131. that's high historically. action in the metals. silver, platinum, all sinking more than 1%. silver was today's biggest loser dropping nearly p 3% to settle at $32.81 an ounce. david: markets hopping, but the next trader says investor participation is shifting. in chicago, larry, the key question here is what happens when the market gets off its hind legs and moves? move up or down? >> it all depends on what happens with the fiscal cliff. right now, there's boehner yelled out by his own party, the conservative part of the wing, and also the left. he's in a really, really tight spot and an ultimate binary trade. if something good happens, we'll rocket higher. if something bad happens, expect the worst right now. that's the thing right now. it's a yes or no trade. liz: congressional know it all at fox news calls it rrpublican on republican violence. hard to get a deal in the own party, special interests, the markets, whatever happens, we want to make mon
wh? confiscation of private pensions happened in greece. it happened in the last year. it happened in agentina. in ireland to pay forbillion stulus spending. a wealth tax of some sort especially on 401(k)s which you point out people put ide to save for their own future i don't think that is out bounds on this presidt at all. he is firmlyommitted to spending and collectivism. eventually bills have to be paid. they will use people's private assets. gerri:ot just the president. every elected official in washington seems to be the exact same way. they want to get our hand on our mon we have to be alert. it not irresponsible to mention it. i don't ink so. jonathan reallyapeciate your time. >> thanks, gerri, we'l be right back with my two cents more and the answer to the question othe day, who do you trust more, the epa or aaa? [ male announcer ] hodo you trade? with cottder strming otes, any way you want. fully ctomize it for your ading process -- from thought to trade, every screen. and all in real time. which kes it just like having your own trading oo righat your fingertips. [ rodg
farm in maine that helps turn greece into finding peace. >> i know when chris died, we kept thinking about how we were going to remember him. and we kept thinking that his spirit was moving through the trees every time you saw them moving. i seem to be drawn to maine even though i've never lived here. it's pretty amazing. >> we're in the wreath business and have been since 1971. columbia falls is a little town in coastal washington county. the perfect little country town kind of thing. we're looking for 12 to 18-inch pieces. as fast as this brush is coming in, we're using it on the other end. we're out on the land that produces the tips for national wreaths across america day. >> each wreath is made of balsam that is picked off of our own land. it began as a family tradition to donate 5,000 wreaths to arlington national cemetery. >> a great source of pride for my family. it's our little way of giving back to the country is through the veterans wreaths program and the new veterans remembers trees program. >> that's captain brent morale, u.s. marine corps. this is another tree has been
repaired, if you will, greece, now. we don't have to worry about europe at least until the second half of the year. we have stability in china because of economic activity and that was a drag and then we have the doj promising tease and the federal reserve doing the same thing and all of a sudden it is not the world looking over the cliff, but we 3-quarters of the world looking the other way starting to come back and that is the difference. tracy: what happens? we are stealing from queue to. >> we always steal from one quarter to another. tracy: europe might come back to bother us again the second half of the year. could that mean an okay first half, second half disaster's again? >> we never have smooth sailing at anything. sell in may and go away. which works sometimes and doesn't work. what we feel good about is investors are forced with a problem that dividend taxes are going to go up. to me that is a good problem because it is going to take investors out of the safety of the blue chips and staples and utilities and put them into faster growth equities. riskier. if we look at the ri
legislator of athens in ancient greece. and he replaced the prevailing system at the time of oral, law and blood feud by a written code of rules that could only be enforced by a court. the first court system. so the rules, because they were written, were hard to get around so they were draconian rules, which is where draconian -- draco. >> wasn't he in harry potter, too? >> he was also in harry potter. i don't know.was he? >> i think he was the bad kid growing up. >> and, anyway, with that out of the way and the world hurdling to an end tomorrow, still to come, if you want to know whether or not you should be optimistic about a fiscal cliff deal -- >> oh, draco malfoy. >> oh, yeah, the young bad kid? >> the blond kid. >> he was so good he was bad. check out the markets on any given day and we're going to do just that. tell what's happening with the fiscal cliff. [ penélope ] i found the best cafe in the world. nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perfect coffee. where every cappuccino and latte is only made with fresh milk. and
. but it's not working in greece. i heard a great saying that says when time gets tough, everyone is a keynesian. turn off the tv. not c-span of course. but turn off the news channels that are just cramming this stuff, and get involved in this before you formulate an opinion. i think we would be voted into office smarter, better people that are not tea party extremists. how about if on the democratic side grover norquist had said never cut any spending? i'm going to sign a bill that says never cut and spending. grover norquist, here's a great example, he does not even believe in economic case multipliers. host: gary says -- guest: what's interesting about the last election cycles is we had under president bush and the end, democrats seized control of congress in big numbers. and we had the big democratic sweep with the white house in 2008. 2010, republicans came sweeping back. we've had a pendulum swing, very contractive time period. that's one of the factors. we have seen both sides really dug in because they don't know where the pendulum will swing in the next direction. -- ekle
wants to see us see what happened in europe and greece. it does not have to happen here. in conjunction with that, this has to be the best place in the world to do business. economic growth, if we grow our economy, it will help our debt and, of course, more opportunity for everyone. so i hope to work with everyone on this table -- everyone at this table on those issues. worse, always making sure -- of course, always making sure that america is safe. we have many challenges around the world. [applause] >> thank you. >> my number one priority echoes what kelly said. we need to come up with a deal that keep us from the automatic spending cuts that go into effect in january and deal with a saner tax system. we can follow a framework as recommended by the simpson- bowles commission that will allow us to protect benefits but will also make some of the tough choices that kelly was talking about. i think we have to put everything on the table for that kind of a deal. we have to look at revenues. we have to look of the domestic side of the budget. we of the look of the defense -- we have to look
because nobody wants to see us see what happened ieurope and greec it does not have to happen here. in conjunction with that, this has to be the best place in the world to do business. economic growth, if we grow our economy, it will help our debt and, of course, more opportunity for everyone. so i hope to work with everyone on this table -- everyone at this table on those issues. worse, always making sure -- of course, always making sure that america is safe. [applause] >> thank you. >> my number one priority echoes what kelly said. we need to come up with a deal that keep us from the automatic spending cuts that go into effect in january and deal with a senior tax system -- a saner tax system. we can follow a framework as recommended by the simpson- bowles commission that will allow us to protect benits but will also make some of the tough choices that kelly was talking about. i think we have to put everything on the table for that kind of a deal. we have to look at revenues. we have to look of the domestic side of the budget. we of the look of the defense side. and we have to lo
they got a tax credit for hiring people if we get this under control so we are not talking about greece and we are not talking ourselves to death. the fiscal sanity then yes, why, because we have markets for products and services i predicted at that point that act would be right where we are are going to be at the end of this year. we had a year-and-a-half to come and work together and build a bridge so that we wouldn't fall off the cliff. and what did we do? electioneered waiting until they are over. when he elections are more important than governing this country coming to get into the trouble that we are in. it's not just wild spending. it's not just tax loopholes. it's about governing and fiscally managing things as you go along. and it doesn't just have to be in the white house, it has to be in congress as well. >> given the frustrations in the process, if a grandchild can to you and said i want to go into politics, would you be discouraging of their intent? >> i would be straight forward with them. when i decided i wanted to run for governor, somebody asked me if my skill was big
maybe greece would take number one. >> we to know that the u.s. spends a larger percentagpercentag e of gdp on health care than any other developed nation by fairly significant amount. really tackling that underlying issue of what percent of our economy is going to health care in general is really the key issue and we should be focused on that much more than the federal government's portion of it and in this case we have a proposal that would actually increase the share of gdp going to help her, taking us in the wrong direction. >> that is assuming that medicare spending with medicare costs and again as somebody usa ran the program -- [inaudible] >> this one is definitely for you specifically and aarp. the question is this. what scorable savings proposal does aarp support or for medicare, beyond better coordination does aarp support means testing, combining parts a and beet are sharing our medigap reform or anything else? >> i think it's important to remind everybody that we recently had a large health care bill called the affordable care act which include $720 billion in medicare sa
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)